Chicken stuffed with gold bars found in corrupt official’s freezer

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OFFICERS HAVE MADE A FARM IN THE HOUSE OF A CORRUPTED OFFICIAL.  PHOTO: ZHEJIANG PROVINCIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE PHOTO: ZHEJIANG PROVINCIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

OFFICERS HAVE MADE A FARM IN THE HOUSE OF A CORRUPTED OFFICIAL. PHOTO: ZHEJIANG PROVINCIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

A new video released by a Chinese anti-corruption agency has revealed a corrupt Chinese official’s unusual method of hiding his ill-gotten gains.

Last April, authorities in the eastern province of Zhejiang launched an official investigation into Jiang Xunbo, a retired senior official in the prefectural city of Quzhou, accused of receiving millions in bribes from of different business leaders. Jiang confessed a day after the investigation began.

The video, posted by the Zhejiang Provincial Supervisory Committee on social media platform WeChat on Sunday, showed footage of officers raiding his mansion. They found bag after bag of frozen meat in his freezer, including chickens, ducks and fish stuffed with gold bars and jewelry wrapped in plastic. They also discovered stacks of debit cards and gifts that Jiang had buried under bamboo trees in his garden.

It also showed Jiang, dressed in a white hazmat suit, sobbing in court. “I accept the legal consequences and deeply regret my crimes,” Jiang said in tears.

Jiang “used his power as a tool to collect money,” the video reads. He reportedly received more than one million yuan in gifts from company executives and subordinates during the Lunar New Year holiday from 1998 to 2018. In 2001, during a business meeting with a company of paper in Shanghai, he received an envelope containing $8,000 in cash, according to the video.

Jiang’s wife also accepted money on his behalf when he was hospitalized in 2010 and exerted influence on his behalf, it is alleged. When her brother’s print shop received public complaints of pollution, she pressed the relevant authorities to waive environmental penalties.

According to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the country’s top anti-corruption body, Jiang was sentenced in January to seven years and six months in prison and fined 500,000 yuan ($69,000) for accepted bribes.

Jiang was used by the Chinese government as an example that even retired officials would not escape punishment. State media released short documentaries on corruption to warn and pressure other officials.

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s sweeping anti-corruption campaign has ensnared more than 1.5 million party members over the years, including some 1,100 executives this year alone, though critics said Xi used the campaigned in part as a cover to purge his political rivals and consolidate his power.

Xi renewed his pledge to crack down on party cadres who colluded with businesses at the party’s national congress last month, where he won an unprecedented third term in office. He swore “absolutely no mercy” for corrupt officials.

In another sign that the crusade is continuing, Fan Yifei, a senior Chinese central banker, has recently become another political figure to watch. Anti-corruption authorities announced on Saturday an investigation into his “alleged serious violations of discipline and the law“, without giving further details.

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